The Oscar nominee is no stranger to racial discrimination.

By Isabel Jones
Mar 06, 2019 @ 11:00 am

Yalitza Aparicio is riding a career high — the newly 25-year-old first-time actress earned an Oscar nomination for her performance in Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma, sweeping onto the red carpet last week looking like a modern-day Cinderella in a seafoam green one-shouldered Rodarte gown. Cue “What Dreams Are Made of.”

But, unfortunately, not everyone has been respectful and supportive of Aparicio’s fairy tale-esque rise to fame.

Mexican TV host Yeka Rosales dressed up as the actress to promote the new season of Televisa’s comedy series La Parodia — and before you claim that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, listen to how she did it. In two Instagram posts (that have yet to be removed), Rosales wore a prosthetic nose and brownface to channel the indigenous Mexican starlet.

Alejandro Olmos, spokesperson for Televisa, told the Associated Press that the network does not support racism and that the program would be edited for “bad taste.” “We do not believe that the production of La Parodia engages in this type of practice,” Olmos said in response to racist claims.

Rosales, for her part, defended her actions by posting a collage of other impersonations she’s done (one of which showed her in blackface), writing “I don’t discriminate.”

According to William Nericcio, a professor at San Diego State University’s Center for Latin American Studies, this behavior, while appalling, is not unusual. “The Mexican elite disposition has always portrayed indigenous people as funny and ugly,” he told AP.

RELATED: Why Every Woman Should See Roma

Twitter users echoed this sentiment:

Yalitza herself said it best: “It shouldn’t matter what you’re into, how you look — you can achieve whatever you aspire to.”

Advertisement