By Jonathan Borge
Jun 28, 2018 @ 10:45 am

Sigh.

It’s been an exhausting week for Americans, has it not? First, the Supreme Court decided to uphold President Trump’s travel ban on seven predominantly Muslim countries; then it undermined women’s reproductive rights by supporting anti-abortion "crisis pregnancy centers" by blocking a law which would require them to inform women of all available options.

And if that wasn't enough, just yesterday we learned that Justice Anthony Kennedy is retiring, making way for Apprentice host-turned-POTUS Trump to nominate a new judge, and chances are high that his appointee could help abolish abortion and LGBTQ rights, reversing the progress so many civil rights activists have fought to make.

Fabulous!

Bloomberg/Getty Images

Well, things continued to bubble on Wednesday after a survey from the Thomson Reuters Foundation dropped some news: the U.S. is the 10th most dangerous country in the world for women, making America the only Western nation in the top 10. Canada, with its really cute Prime Minister, doesn't sound so bad at the moment, eh?

Sitting above the U.S. on the list are, in order: India, Afghanistan, Syria, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Yemen, and Nigeria. According to the survey, which was answered by 548 professionals, academics and policy-makers worldwide, women in these countries are at a greater risk for sexual violence; lack adequate healthcare resources; and face many, many forms of abuse and human rights offenses.

Factors that contribute to the dangerous environment include cultural traditions, harassment, stoning, female infanticide, forced marriage, human trafficking, and potential sex slavery.

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So why did the U.S. make the list? The #MeToo movement and Time’s Up campaigns helped highlight the sexual harassment and inequalities women in America face. “People want to think income means you’re protected from misogyny, and sadly that’s not the case,” Cindy Southworth, executive vice president of the Network to End Domestic Violence, said. “We are going to look back and see this as a very powerful tipping point ... We’re blowing the lid off and saying ‘#Metoo and Time’s Up’.”

To lighten the load, here are 50 badass women literally changing the world—because someone has to.