By Camille Nzengung
Jan 06, 2019 @ 6:15 pm

Today's Golden Globes red carpet is more than just one of the most fashion-forward nights in Hollywood — it's also the one year anniversary of last year's red carpet black out, when guests wore all black as a show of solidarity for the Time's Up movement. 

After allegations of abuse and sexual misconduct were revealed within the entertainment industry (most notably, Harvey Weinstein’s decades-long history of bad behavior), a coalition of Hollywood’s leading ladies came together on Jan. 1, 2018 to form the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund, an initiative to fight sexual harassment, assault, and inequality across all industries.

Christopher Polk/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Just days later, the Golden Globes Awards not only embraced the symbolic sea of black dresses, but stars donned #MeToo pins and many women walked hand-in-hand with activist leaders such as #MeToo founder, Tarana Burke.

RELATED: A Brief Timeline of the Time's Up Movement

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It was truly a historic moment as Hollywood stood together to draw, as Meryl Streep put it, a “thick black line” to say enough is enough.

And now one year later, the movement has made its great return to the awards show, with the hopes of keeping up the momentum gained from last year. At this year's ceremony, attendees will be wearing black and white ribbons and bands that were designed by Hollywood costume designer Arianne Phillips, who designed last year's pins as well.

Kevork Djansezian/NBC/Getty Images

The ribbons symbolize that the Time's Up supporters are tied together in their "joint commitment to create a safe, fair and dignified workplaces for women of all kinds," according to Variety

“These ribbons are a reminder to the world that our momentum as women continues to grow," said Ai Jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, who attended the show with Roma director Alfonso Cuarón. "That’s why I’m so honored to have been invited by Alfonso Cuarón to the Golden Globes this year to represent the millions of domestic workers who continue to fight for basic recognition and dignity. Across industries, we know the power of this movement is unstoppable.”

The political accessories are also a nod to the organization's newly launched TIME’s UPx2 initiative that was created to “double the number of women in leadership and across other spaces were women are underrepresented.”

The Time's Up merchandise will be available for purchase on Sunday on their website, 100 percent of net proceeds supporting Time's Up, funding the Time's Up Legal Defense Fund and other initiatives to achieve safe, fair and dignified work for women of all kinds.

In the year since they launched, more than 3,800 women (and men) have reached out for help and as of last October, the organization has raised over $22 million to provide legal aid to sexual assault victims. 

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