The tweets are savage.

By Christopher Luu
Oct 15, 2019 @ 10:15 pm

UPDATED, Oct. 16 at 2:00 p.m. : Jamil responded to Sampaio by bringing up Victoria's Secret's problematic track record. 

Sampaio responded in kind, admitting that VS has made mistakes, but refusing to further the Twitter "feud."

Jamil seemed to put an end to the dialogue by wishing Sampaio luck in her prospective activism.

Actor and activist Jameela Jamil has come under fire today for something she posted to Twitter on Sunday.

The Good Place star shared a clip from a fashion show that showed a model dancing and having fun, with the caption, "Oh my god this looks like the most fun, and not a long-starved terrified teenager in sight. Beautiful." 

Model Sara Sampaio called her out for generalizing, saying that not all models were starving and miserable. Jamil wasn't satisfied to let things go, however, and the two clashed online.

Sampaio wasn't the only one to call out Jamil's characterization of models. Several Twitter users supported Sampaio's point that calling a whole group of people "starved scared teenagers" was offensive. They added that the modeling industry isn't the only one with a fixation on looks or bodies.

RELATED: Jameela Jamil Isn't Afraid to Walk Away From Deals Where She's Offered Less Money Than Men

Sampaio noted that the problems that Jamil presented exist outside of the modeling world, too. "Eating disorders, drugs and cocaine use aren’t a exclusive problem of models, it’s a huge problem is society as a whole."

The barbs kept flying, with Jamil defending her opinions and saying that Sampaio was living in a "bubble" if she was willing to continue the argument.

Fans were divided, with some supporting Jamil's stance. 

RELATED: Jameela Jamil Calls It Like She Sees It

Others saw Jamil's statements as hypocrisy, since she was celebrating one body type while seeming to put another down.

Twitter user Rachael may be the one to be pointing the finger in the right direction, saying that it was the industry, not the individuals, that need to be addressed. It's not the models, but the fashion industry that needs to take a closer look at the way it presents women's bodies.

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