Imagine swapping emoji with Meghan and Kate.

By Christopher Luu
Aug 27, 2019 @ 8:45 pm

It may not be often, but the royal family really can be just like us. During an appearance on Good Morning Britain, Mike Tindall explained that to keep things running smoothly, the royals have a WhatsApp group chat that everyone uses to keep their schedules straight. According to People, not everyone gets in on the action, but the royals use it just like everyone else: to get all the conversations in one place.

"It's just what you do to try and set up get-togethers and we are going to something that is the same," Tindall explained. He would know, too, since he's married to Zara Tindall, the queen's granddaughter. "If you are going to go, 'Are you going to take the kids?' Quite a lot of people have family WhatsApp groups. I don't think it's a new revelation."

Karwai Tang/Getty Images

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Tindall didn't name names, but he mentioned some general information, saying that Zara's cousins were in at least one group. Those famous cousins include Princes William and Harry. And the "cousins" could include Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle, too.

"Me, my brother, and then a few of Zara's side like her brother Pete and the cousins are on WhatsApp groups," Tindall told The Daily Mirror back in 2018.

It's entirely possible that Tindall, Zara, and the rest of the royals used the app and its group chat features to coordinate their meet up at the Burnham Market international horse trials in Norfolk. Kate and William's older kids, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, rubbed shoulders with Zara and her brood, Mia and Lena.

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Of course, Tindall was as British as can be when the issue of WhatsApp etiquette came up. He admitted that the royals aren't the most tech-savvy bunch, so WhatsApp is perfect for them. He's also very prudent about leaving groups. Instead of just bowing out, he'll linger so that nobody thinks he's being impolite. It works, but it makes for a lot of group chats.

"I wouldn't say we're cutting edge, but it's just easier for some reason on WhatsApp," he said. "I'm in about 25,000 groups. You might do it for a get-together and just stay on the group, and occasionally people will post. You're scared to leave because you don't want to be seen to be rude."

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