One color, two very different looks.

By Sam Reed
Updated: May 23, 2019 @ 6:05 pm
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Pink has gotten a bad rap over the years, but if the pink Power Ranger has taught us anything, it's that the color can be powerful — badass even, and not just the color that once served as a symbol of sweetness and girlhood.

 

While celebrities — Kim Kardashian, Olivia Wilde, and Elle Fanning included — have recently embraced the shade, reflecting a current trend in the fashion industry, the color has also reached far beyond the Hollywood hills, extending its rosy reach all the way to Capitol Hill.

 

VIDEO: Helen Mirren Debuts Pink Hair at Cannes Film Festival

 

On Thursday, two prominent women in the political sphere made statements in the of-the-moment color. While addressing the actions of President Trump, who stormed out of a meeting with Democrats today, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi each opted for the hot hue.

 

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

 

Sanders — whose allegiance to the president runs so deep she came under fire for allegedly lying on the his behalf (she called it a "slip of the tongue") — stood before reporters in a pastel pink shift dress adorned with matching pink pearls and beige suede pumps.

 

Now, one needs to look no further than Khloe Kardashian’s latex pale pink bodysuit to know that the color can make a statement when styled the right way. But the pearls sitting atop Sanders’s collarbone — long a hallmark of traditional, moneyed matriarch aesthetics — gave her a congenial appearance; her ensemble was soft and calm even as she delivered sharp-tongued words to the press. She was there to clean up Trump’s mess, while simultaneously looking traditionally "feminine."

On the other end of the spectrum sits Speaker Pelosi. During her weekly press conference on the same day, the 79-year-old stepped out in a hot pink shift dress not dissimilar in shape and cut to the one worn by Sanders. She even styled the ensemble with matching nude suede pumps, just like the White House Press Secretary. Where Sanders chose pearls, however, Pelosi chose matching gold bangles, earrings, and a beaded necklace.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

 

Sanders’s look is one of approachable femininity, as the lighter shade, as well as her accessories, are steeped in traditional gender stereotypes (pale pink is a “non-threatening” hue according to color expert Elaine Ryan). In 2018, we even dubbed the hue “passenger-seat pink” as it was so common among women in power-adjacent positions.

 

RELATED: Pretty In Passenger-Seat Pink: Why Are Women In Power-Adjacent Positions Flocking Toward the Feminine Hue? 

 

Pelosi has a penchant for bold colors (remember the red coat?), and there's power in being the brightest person in the room. As the leader of the House, Pelosi is the defacto face of Trump's opposition. Her bold looks send the message: "I'm not backing down." (Impeachment debate aside, that is.)

 

Other firebrand politicians have followed in Pelosi’s brighter-is-better footsteps, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. 

 

Pink, in all its shades, is starting to shake it’s “girly girl” connotation as our culture begins to consider gender norms as constructs rather than part of a rigid, binary system. That said, we’re light years away from such an accepting society — especially when it comes to politics. (Ahem, Alabama.)

We'll take what we can get for now, which is, I guess, just two women in power who aren't afraid to wear pink. 

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