By Alicia Brunker
Updated Oct 13, 2018 @ 11:30 am
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In June, the media had a field day when first lady Melania Trump made an unannounced visit to an immigrant children's detention center in McAllen, Texas wearing a Zara trench that seemingly scrawled her feelings toward the crisis on the back: "I Really Don't Care. Do U?"

A few days following the incident, Melania's communications director, Stephanie Grisham, said her jacket was just a jacket. Period.

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in a $39 Zara military trench coat with the message, "I Really Don't Care. Do U?" on the back. The First Lady wore it while departing Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland for McAllen, Texas, where she arrived for a visit to an immigrant children's detention center.

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"Today’s visit w the children in Texas impacted @flotus greatly. If media would spend their time & energy on her actions & efforts to help kids - rather than speculate & focus on her wardrobe - we could get so much accomplished on behalf of children," she said, adding the hashtags #SheCares and #ItsJustAJacket to drive home her point.

However, it turns out that the military-style trench did hold a hidden meaning, according to FLOTUS herself. And it was directed towards the left-wing media.

During her first sit-down interview as First Lady with ABC News, Melania explained her decision behind throwing on the controversial coat. “I wore the jacket to go on the plane and off the plane,” Mrs. Trump said. “And it was for the people and for the left-wing media to show them that I don’t care. You will not stop me to do what I feel is right.”

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“It was kind of a message,” Melania continued. “I would prefer that they would focus on what I do and my initiatives, than what I wear.”

While her tone deaf wardrobe statement received plenty of backlash, Melania appeared unconcerned, admitting that her only focus was on the children.

"I saw it on the news and I reacted right away,” she said when asked why she visited the detention center. “It was unacceptable for me to see children and parents separated. It was heartbreaking. And I reacted with my own voice. I went to the border.”