By Alexandra Whittaker and Isabel Jones
Jul 11, 2018 @ 7:45 am

Meghan Markle just can't let her fans breathe, serving look after look while out on royal visits with her husband Prince Harry. On this week's agenda? A royal trip to Ireland, the couple's first international visit on royal business together.

After wearing not one, not two, but three different looks the day before, Markle started her second day in Ireland in a similar vein, wearing two very different looks before noon. What, you don't make a post-breakfast costume change?

The name of the game this week for Markle has been using her clothes to send a message. Her green Givenchy dress that she wore when she first landed in Ireland was all about paying homage to the country.

The seemingly simple LBD that followed was also full of hidden meaning as an olive branch of sorts, as it was designed by Emilia Wickstead, who criticized Markle's wedding dress before apologizing. 

BRIAN LAWLESS

RELATED: Meghan Markle's Simple LBD Is Actually a Message to the Designer Who Slammed Her Wedding Dress

Meghan and Harry kicked off their second day in Ireland with a visit to the country's President, Michael D. Higgins. The Duchess wore a gray Roland Mouret frock for the occasion, which she paired with a set of black pumps.

WPA Pool/Getty Images

Markle shifted gears completely with her second outfit of the day—opting for a sleek black suit and a pair of magical Sarah Flint pumps for her trip to Croke Park to meet with young soccer players. 

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Chic as this tailored look is, that's not what we want to discuss this morning. This is:

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

What is this wizardry? How is Meghan managing to stay perfectly above ground on a soccer field (!) in spindly four-inch stilettos?

Later in the day, Markle (and her miracle shoes) took on cobblestones like a true champ. When fans commented on her stiletto navigation know-how, Meghan responded, "I'm trying!"

If the Duchess of Sussex's shoe choice wasn't advertisement enough, this new development will (and should) send millions flocking to the so-called "Perfect Pump."