But it's not necessarily a good thing. 

By Kimberly Truong
Jan 21, 2020 @ 11:00 am

Since Meghan Markle and Prince Harry announced their decision to step back from the royal family, you might have been seeing more photos of Meghan out and about than usual, from her airport pickup to her Vancouver Island outing

The seeming influx of candid photos isn't a coincidence — nor are the photos necessarily a good thing, despite how much we might like being able to see Meghan casually out on her own.

On Tuesday, U.K. tabloid The Sun published candid pictures of Meghan in Canada with Archie and her dogs. However, Harry and Meghan have reportedly issued a legal warning over the paparazzi images. According to SkyNews, lawyers for the Sussexes claimed the pictures were taken without her consent — and that the photographer was hiding in the bushes and spying on her. They also claimed there were previous attempts to photograph the couple inside their home using long range lenses and that paparazzi were permanently camped outside their home.

NBC News London correspondent Kelly Cobiella pointed out on Today, that over the past year or so, we never saw candids of Meghan walking the dogs in Windsor outside the couple's home, Frogmore Cottage — noting that things have already changed for the couple.

"Now we've not only seen Meghan walking the dogs, but Harry arriving at the airport, (and) Meghan taking off from the airport to one of her events last week, so things may have already changed," Cobielle said. "The privacy rules are really, really strong here [in Britain] in part because of Harry and William, and the days when they were growing up, those privacy rules were put in place to protect them for the large part. Now they're moving to a place where those rules don't apply."

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While those privacy rules may not apply in Canada, their legal warning makes it clear that Meghan and Harry are setting their own boundaries to fight for, as Harry put it in a speech over the weekend, "a more peaceful life."

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