Throwing shade: it's a good thing.

By InStyle.com
Oct 23, 2019 @ 10:30 pm

Martha Stewart knows her way around a prison uniform, so if she says something, pay attention. During a panel at Vanity Fair's sixth Annual New Establishment Summit, Stewart voiced a few thoughts about Felicity Huffman's prison-issue ensemble, saying that she should have added a little bit of pizzazz to her jumpsuit. Huffman was seen in a green prison uniform a few days after she reported to the Federal Correctional Institution in Dublin, California.

“She should style her outfit a little bit more. She looked pretty schlumpy,” Stewart said. "She made a horrible mistake and she's experiencing what happens."

Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

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Back in 2004, Stewart served a bit of jail time herself. After lying about the sale of a stock, she was incarcerated for five months and then spent an additional five months in home confinement. While Stewart and Huffman aren't having the exact same experience, Stewart is privy to a little more knowledge about the whole thing since she's had time on the inside. That's more than anyone else that was on the panel.

People reports that in an interview with Katie Couric in 2007, Stewart said that her time behind bars was undignified and that only murderers should have to endure it.

"It was horrifying, and no one, no one should have to go through that kind of indignity really except for murderers, and there are a few other categories, but no one should have to go through that," Stewart told Couric. "It's a very, very awful thing."

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Huffman is serving a 14-day sentence for her involvement in the college admissions scandal. Back in May, she pleaded guilty to paying consultant Rick Singer $15,000 to have an SAT proctor change her daughter Sophia's test answers. Huffman will finish her sentence on October 27. In addition to her jail time, Huffman must pay a $30,000 fine, serve 250 hours of community service, and has a year of supervised release.

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