Long live the rom-com.

By Christopher Luu
Aug 01, 2019 @ 7:45 pm

Devotees of the rom-com have reason to celebrate. How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, the 2003 film starring Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey, is heading to the small screen — the very small screen. Deadline reports that Quibi, a soon-to-be-launched "mobile-focused streaming platform" is working to adapt the film into a multi-episode series.

The series-style take on How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days will involve "a glib young online writer and an oversexed advertising executive, both looking to prove they're capable of being in a monogamous relationship," E! Online adds. Benjamin Barry, played by McConaughey, will still be an ad exec.

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Guy Branum wrote the series and brought it into 2019 by dropping the lead role (Andie Anderson, originally played by Hudson) into the world of online journalism instead of print. Branum has plenty of experience in the comedy world, with credits ranging from Awkward, Punk'd, Another Period, and Billy on the Street to cult-classic The Mindy Project

There's no news on casting yet, but Quibi isn't short on star power. E! adds that other than the not-so-subtle change of taking Anderson's job online, the rest of the plot seems to follow the film. Viewers won't know exactly how much of the classic rom-com will get reinterpreted or if the new show will be a shot-for-shot remake, much like Disney's live-action remakes of its animated classics.

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Set to launch in April 2020, the new service already has huge names on its roster. In addition to the How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days series, the platform will also launch projects with Tyra Banks, Justin Timberlake, Zac Efron, and Chrissy Teigen — and that's only the beginning. More than 20 series have already been announced and every day, more and more are being added, giving viewers even more reason to be attached to their phones. The mobile-first approach means the shows aren't following any sort of traditional structure. Some of the series have episodes that clock in at less than 10 minutes and others are set to be reality and competition shows.

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