By Alexandra Whittaker
Updated: Sep 05, 2018 @ 4:41 pm
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If you've ever cruised down a highway, belting the chorus of Carrie Underwood's "Before He Cheats" — the one where she sings about literally demolishing a cheating ex's car — you've got a pretty good sense that Underwood is not timid. 

Let's not pretend to be surprised that Carrie Underwood can pull punches when she needs to. As the pregnant singer preps for a tour, she still raised eyebrows by going to bat over sexism in her industry — because honestly, she's pretty fed up. She visited the Women Want to Hear Women podcast with Elaina Smith to talk about the lack of female representation in country music, and she had a surprisingly intense bone to pick with the trite cliché that "women don't want to hear women" on the radio. 

“That’s B.S," she said. "Even when I was growing up, I wished there was [sic] more women on the radio and I had a lot more than there are today.“

Jeff Kravitz

"Think about all of the little girls that are sitting at home saying, ‘I want to be a country music singer.’ What do you tell them? What do you do? How do you look at them and say, ‘Well, just work hard, sweetie, and you can do it.’ When that’s not the case right now," she added.

RELATED: Carrie Underwood Is Pregnant with Her Second Child

"‘Cause I see so many girls out there bustin’ their rear ends and so many guys out there that it’s some new guy out there has a No. 1, and I’m like, ‘Good for you, that’s great, but who are you? And then these strong women who are super talented that totally deserve it are not getting the same opportunities. But how to change it? I don’t know. How do we change it?’”

Underwood's pretty mindful of this gap in her own work too. She's recruited a country duo named Maddie & Tae to join her on the Cry Pretty tour, but she also made it clear that this wasn't some handout to them. 

“First and foremost, they’ve earned it,” Underwood said. “I’m not throwing anybody a bone by taking them out on tour with me. They deserve to be there and they’re gonna put on a great show, and I’m already proud of all that they’ve done. I’m a fan, you know?”

After hearing what Underwood does to guys who have wronged her (she took a Louisville slugger to both headlights, guys), it would be wise of the country music industry to take her calls for change seriously. 

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