We've seen this from her before.

By Christopher Luu
Updated Jan 27, 2020 @ 7:00 pm
Advertisement

The last time Blake Lively was deep into a promo tour, the world got a slew of Very, Very Good Suits. That was for A Simple Favor, which had Lively playing a character that was clad almost entirely in menswear-inspired getups that included bejeweled walking canes, ascots (no joke), and three-piece suits with no shirt. Lively's press tour looks were an homage to her role and it looks like she's doing it all over again for her latest flick, The Rhythm Section.

Today, Lively stepped out wearing a very vintage femme fatale ensemble that included a flowing blush trench coat and a pair of gloves and boots in a deep oxblood. It's a little bit Clue, a lot Bond villain, and 100% a reflection of her role as Stephanie Patrick. She explained it on her Instagram, which showed her in costume, which happened to feature the same sort of pin-up hairstyle and throwback vibe. The movie includes plenty of other wigs, including a choppy black number and other out-there options that are sure to make Moira Rose proud. Patrick is a woman who's out for revenge after her family is murdered, which may explain the over-the-top gloves and slightly sinister boots.

Robert Kamau/Getty Images

This is just the first day of Lively's press tour, the first since she gave birth to her third daughter, so it's not clear whether or not she'll keep up the character study. What's even more impressive is that Lively does it all without the help of a stylist, so that Simple Favor tour de force was all her.

"I have control issues and a big ego — that's probably the honest answer [for why I won't hire a stylist]. I just like it. I love design and I love fashion and it's a way to be creative. In my job, I get to be creative, but it's over a period of time and so many other people are involved, whereas this is a beginning, middle, and end, and I get to be creative and there's an end date in the near future," she told WWDback in 2018. "It's the same reason why I like doing my friends' hair and makeup or cooking — you get to be creative and finish it. Whereas with my job you do it and then two years later it's finished. It probably goes back to the control issues; it's like, 'OK, I did it, I completed it, it's done!'"