Isabel Jones
Mar 16, 2018 @ 10:30 am

As if Ava DuVernay weren’t already leaps and bounds ahead of mainstream Hollywood, the barrier-breaking director just made history once more.

On Thursday, EW confirmed that DuVernay would direct upcoming DC superhero movie New Gods. The news cements Ava as the second woman to direct a DC adaptation (following Wonder Woman’s Patty Jenkins), and the first black woman to ever direct a DC Comics book film.

Scroll down below to look back at DuVernay's impressive history of cinematic firsts.

 Karwai Tang/WireImage

She’s the First African-American Female Director to Be Nominated for a Golden Globe

Ava made history in 2015 when she was nominated for best director at the Golden Globes for Martin Luther King biopic Selma.

She’s the First African-American Female Director to Have Her Film Nominated for an Oscar

While she wasn’t nominated for best director at the Oscars—a sleight that propelled the #OscarsSoWhite backlash—Selma did earn a nomination for Best Picture, crowning DuVernay the first black woman to have a film she directed nominated in the category.

She’s the First Black Woman to Win the Director’s Prize at Sundance

In 2012, DuVernay became the first woman to win the Director’s Prize at Sundance Film Festival, taking home the honor for her second feature film, Middle of Nowhere.

RELATED: The History of Women Nominated for the Best Director Oscar

She’s the First Black Woman to Helm a $100 Million Film

Ava became the first African American woman to direct a live-action film with a budget larger than $100 million with A Wrinkle in Time. Only two other women have ever done so: Kathryn Bigelow (K-19: The Widowmaker) and Patty Jenkins (Wonder Woman).

She and Black Panther Director Ryan Coogler Are the First Black Directors to Dominate the Box Office in the No. 1 and No. 2 Positions

DuVernay and Coogler made box office history in March when their respective projects (A Wrinkle in Time and Black Panther) became the weekend’s highest grossing films.