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4 Flattering Ombre Trends for Brown Hair to Try Now

Short for “subtle ombre” but also dubbed “babylights” the super-soft effect seen on Miranda Kerr is a play on the lighter tones your hair would naturally take on after playing outside as a kid. “It’s a sunkissed look, and there’s a natural transition of color from root to end with no harsh line of demarcation,” says Estroff. “The idea is a really fine highlight so that you don’t see those little streaks that can sometimes be apparent with other kinds of ombre.” This effect works on any shade of brunette, just be sure your colorist chooses tones complementary to your eye color and complexion in the direction that your hair naturally lifts. - Don Arnold/Getty Images

Sombre

Short for “subtle ombre” but also dubbed “babylights” the super-soft effect seen on Miranda Kerr is a play on the lighter tones your hair would naturally take on after playing outside as a kid. “It’s a sunkissed look, and there’s a natural transition of color from root to end with no harsh line of demarcation,” says Estroff. “The idea is a really fine highlight so that you don’t see those little streaks that can sometimes be apparent with other kinds of ombre.” This effect works on any shade of brunette, just be sure your colorist chooses tones complementary to your eye color and complexion in the direction that your hair naturally lifts. Don Arnold/Getty Images
“Bronde definitely falls into the category of being more blonde at the ends,” says Estroff. The same natural fade remains standard with this look. If you’re looking to channel your Jenny from the Block ambitions, keep in mind that darker tones will need to be lifted quite a bit to keep any brassiness from forming, so Bronde may work best on light to medium-hued brunettes. - Gregg DeGuire/WireImage

Bronde

“Bronde definitely falls into the category of being more blonde at the ends,” says Estroff. The same natural fade remains standard with this look. If you’re looking to channel your Jenny from the Block ambitions, keep in mind that darker tones will need to be lifted quite a bit to keep any brassiness from forming, so Bronde may work best on light to medium-hued brunettes. Gregg DeGuire/WireImage
If you have a medium to dark base color, consider going for a tortoiseshell effect like Jessica Alba’s. Also called “ecaille,” this look mixes golden tones and warm browns, often using a balayage technique where the color is hand-painted onto your hair. Estroff notes that while balayage is a popular method for creating a tortoisehell hue, other techniques can also be used to achieve it. - Jacopo Raule/Getty Images

Tortoiseshell

If you have a medium to dark base color, consider going for a tortoiseshell effect like Jessica Alba’s. Also called “ecaille,” this look mixes golden tones and warm browns, often using a balayage technique where the color is hand-painted onto your hair. Estroff notes that while balayage is a popular method for creating a tortoisehell hue, other techniques can also be used to achieve it. Jacopo Raule/Getty Images
Have a super-dark natural base like Mila Kunis’s that has rarely shifted in shade? Going about two shades lighter will result in the most gorgeous coffee hue that spans from your mid-lengths to ends. “If you have very dark hair, whether or not you’ve had it colored, you’re realistically probably not going to get that light,” Estroff says. “The look becomes very stylized when you add more contrast, as opposed to keeping it more subtle and closer to your natural shade.” Often times, dark hair can take on a red tone when lifted, so speak to your hairstylist if this isn’t what you’re going for, as there are many ways to keep your highlights from taking on an unintentional auburn shade. - Steve Granitz/WireImage

Rich Mocha

Have a super-dark natural base like Mila Kunis’s that has rarely shifted in shade? Going about two shades lighter will result in the most gorgeous coffee hue that spans from your mid-lengths to ends. “If you have very dark hair, whether or not you’ve had it colored, you’re realistically probably not going to get that light,” Estroff says. “The look becomes very stylized when you add more contrast, as opposed to keeping it more subtle and closer to your natural shade.” Often times, dark hair can take on a red tone when lifted, so speak to your hairstylist if this isn’t what you’re going for, as there are many ways to keep your highlights from taking on an unintentional auburn shade. Steve Granitz/WireImage

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