PAID CONTENT
Discover the Multifaceted Designers of
instyle_logo bluenile-logo

Ten Ten

An Exclusive Diamond Engagement Ring
Capsule Collection

Click on the diamond facets to learn
about these one-of-a-kind pieces

Every diamond tells a story, not just about the person who wears it, but its long journey from the earth to the hand of its recipient.

Ten/Ten is a project that brings together ten independent jewelry designers with 100 ethically and sustainably sourced diamonds from Botswana to explore the harmonious connection between enduring natural beauty and energetic modern design. Each designer created and produced a limited edition of rings, resulting in a special collection of ten spectacular designs.

We caught up with the talented creators of Ten/Ten to learn about the craftsmanship behind their dynamic designs and to see how they re-imagined the iconic engagement ring for today’s conscious clients. Click on the diamond facets to find out more about these one-of-a-kind pieces.

The
Final
Cut

Sarr’s ring, “Serene,” is crafted as a single piece, but it can be further personalized by adding complementary curved rings from the ALMASIKA collection. “I created a ring that could evolve with time because I like the idea of flexibility when it comes to what should adorn this special finger,” says Sarr.

Catherine Sarr

of ALMASIKA

Track

THE INSPIRATION

Following a global career in jewelry design that took her from Paris to London and Abu Dhabi, Catherine Sarr founded her celebrity-favorite jewelry line, ALMASIKA, to explore the stories and symbols that cultures have in common. “My Ten/Ten ring represents a lyrical energy arising from love,” she says. “Gold streams revolve in a sinuous harmony, forming a powerful and infinite bond that is also embodied by the diamond.”

The Materials

Sarr was excited to work with diamonds from Botswana for this collection and eager to be a part of the diamond industry’s shift towards sustainability. “Holding a stone that has been on earth for over a billion years feels magical,” she says. “Knowing that the diamonds came from Botswana helped to influence my design. I knew the diamond had to be central because of the responsible chain it represents—a core value has been at the heart of my brand since inception.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

“I was amazed by the sparkles of life in these diamonds,” says Mejia, whose ring is named Mara—meaning “eternally beautiful” in Greek. “I also followed the shape of our fingers, which are actually squared in shape (versus round), for a beautiful and comfortable fit.”

Aurora Lopez Mejia

of Aurora Lopez Mejia

Track

THE INSPIRATION

Originally an artist and sculptor, Aurora Lopez Mejia began creating jewelry as an exploration of etymology and her fascination with the talismans of ancient civilizations. “I decided to hand-inscribe phrases that had special meanings to me on gold bands as constant wearable reminders,” she says. Mejia’s Ten/Ten engagement ring draws inspiration from tribal African designs and the lasting power of words. “I topped off my design with a hand-inscription of the word LOVE, which always faces the palm of one’s hand like a little secret.”

The Materials

Respect for the earth is central to Mejia’s practice as a jewelry designer. “A pure diamond should not be tainted,” she explains. “For me they represent clarity. As I learned about the integrity of the people De Beers works with in Botswana, I was incredibly honored to be a part of this project.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

Bongiasca’s ring, “You’re So Mine,” features a removable white enamel band, which overlaps an elegantly simple gold band and brilliant natural diamond. “It’s as though the ring is alive, and a vine enveloped it, bringing color and life to a piece that, before, was just gold.”

Bea Bongiasca

of Bea Bongiasca

Track

THE INSPIRATION

Bea Bongiasca is a Milan-based jewelry designer whose designs are influenced by her fascinations with East Asia and popular culture. Each of her pieces function as a tiny fantasy world in which wearers can immerse themselves. “The ring that I made for the Ten/Ten project follows the concept of my ‘You’re So Vine’ collection, which is inspired by the idea of ‘contaminating’ simple gold jewelry with intertwined vines. As it’s an engagement ring, I decided to use white enamel instead of a bolder color because I think that it marries well with the white of the diamond.”

The Materials

Excited by the opportunity to work with responsibly sourced diamonds, Bongiasca wanted to design an engagement ring that was both creative and versatile. “As a millennial, I think that less is more,” she says. “This ring has a unique design in that it’s actually two rings. They are made to be either worn together, or the enamel part of the ring can be removed so you can wear the diamond on a simple gold band.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

Lauren Harwell Godfrey’s “Motu” ring was inspired by her honeymoon in Bora Bora, a South Pacific island known for its exquisite pearls. “The reef islet that surrounds the lagoon there is called a motu,” she explains. “The mother of pearl halo on this ring is the motu to its beautiful diamond.”

Lauren Harwell Godfrey

of Harwell Godfrey

Track

THE INSPIRATION

Prior to becoming a jewelry designer, Lauren Harwell Godfrey worked in fashion advertising and attended culinary school with ambitions of becoming a food stylist. “One day I made myself a piece of jewelry and completely fell in love with it,” she explains. “I’m still new to the industry, so being a part of Ten/Ten has been a dream!” The piece she made for the collection is inspired by her own engagement ring and her interest in geometry. “I use a lot of shapes in my work and love the way a round diamond sits so perfectly inside of a hexagon—it’s so visually interesting.”

The Materials

Harwell Godfrey was thrilled by both the materials and educational opportunities provided by the Ten/Ten program. “We learned about everything from mining to tracking and the history of the diamond industry in Botswana,” she says. “Understanding where and how a diamond is sourced is crucial to protecting the people who are working to sustainably mine these gemstones.” Harwell Godfrey’s ring also features a mother-of-pearl inlay that complements the center diamond and gives it extra visual weight and iridescence.

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

“The Union” carries a sense of balance and continuity thanks to Oladunjoye’s graduated beaded design, which peaks with a brilliant, bezel-set solitaire diamond. The name comes from the marriage between the ring’s warm precious metal and its sparkling natural stone.

Lola Oladunjoye

of Lola Fenhirst

Track

THE INSPIRATION

Lola Oladunjoye came to fine jewelry as a second career, having spent 18 years practicing intellectual property law in Silicon Valley. “I tested the creative waters through a series of night classes where I discovered metalsmithing. I was instantly fascinated by the alchemy of seeing metals change form and the thrill of making pieces by hand,” she says. Now the creative director of Lola Fenhirst, the Paris-based designer draws inspiration from her West African Yoruba heritage and takes pride in using the sustainably sourced materials that are a hallmark of her brand.

The Materials

“When you look at a diamond, you’re looking at an organic creation of nature,” says Oladunjoye. “Since the majority of the world’s diamond supply comes from Africa, which is where I come from, it’s important to me that the diamond industry’s revenues are funneled towards building communities and creating economic empowerment. I was beyond delighted to be part of the Ten/Ten collection, as it’s incredibly important to me to work on projects that tie directly back to Africa and shine a light on the beauty of our natural resources.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

Marla Aaron’s design is called “DiMe Siempre,” which means “tell me always” - a fitting name for a ring that’s engineered to carry a secret message of love within.

MARLA AARON

OF MARLA AARON

Track

THE INSPIRATION

Marla Aaron describes herself as “more of a curious person that likes to solve problems,” than a designer. “I started experimenting with the utility of clasp-less chains and locks, eventually launching a business with nothing more than enthusiasm and the view that if I wanted jewelry like this, then others would want it too,” she says. What began with a lock now includes thousands of pieces that are praised for both their practicality and workmanship. For her Ten/Ten piece, Aaron took one of her brand’s popular designs that opens to reveal a secret message and applied the same concept to an engagement ring.

The Process

It was a real design conundrum to figure out how to achieve the opening and include the setting. Then I remembered how evening bag closures are often jeweled and the proverbial lightbulb went off: The setting itself could be the “clasp” of the ring.”

The Materials

According to Aaron, jewelry should be two things: precious and sturdy. “Diamonds are the highest expression of this,” she says. “I feel a great responsibility taking metals and stones from the earth and using them for adornment—when thinking about new pieces, I always ask myself, ‘Is it worth it to do this? Am I adding something useful and beautiful to the world?’” Working with natural and sustainably sourced diamonds from Botswana gave Aaron a clear answer. “Jewelry has one job, and that is to bring joy to people,” she says. “Being a part of this group has given me a chance to do that with an extraordinary group of designers.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

Fantaci’s solitaire diamond ring, “Naledi,” is a feminine and modern piece whose name translates to “star” in Setswana. The timeless setting allows this piece to work beautifully as a statement, or in concert with other jewelry.

Michelle Fantaci

of Michelle Fantaci

Track

THE INSPIRATION

New York native Michelle Fantaci grew up surrounded by artists, makers, and designers. She discovered her passion for jewelry at a young age and followed it to Florence, where she studied old-world metalsmithing techniques under the Italian masters. “I didn’t rely on a symbol or inspiration for my Ten/Ten ring, but rather leaned into the idea of a solitaire diamond design and considered how I might push it beyond its traditional appeal,” she says. “The aesthetic is based on different design elements layered upon each other and lends itself to myriad interpretations. I hope that this approach will help clients to attach their own personal meanings to each ring.”

The Materials

The origin of gems and metals is important to Fantaci, particularly when it comes to diamonds. “We want to support only those mines and governments that are ensuring safe working conditions, living wages, the health of the surrounding area and community,” she explains. “Botswana is a hugely inspiring success story. As designers, we were educated about the process of diamond manufacturing in Botswana, its history, and the supply chain. Every part of this collection has been a thoughtful process.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

Love’s “Treccia Ring” features a braid motif that wraps around the finger and holds a brilliant diamond, symbolizing the unification of two lives.

Pamela Love

of Pamela Love

Track

THE INSPIRATION

For Pamela Love, diamonds mean permanence. “They formed over a billion years ago under great pressure,” she says. “They have been here long before us and will be here long after we are gone. Diamonds are the ultimate symbol of undying love and commitment.” Love’s Ten/Ten engagement ring represents the intertwining of two lives and the possibility of becoming three—a concept that is elegantly expressed by her braided metal band.

The Materials

“In their natural form, diamonds are rough and unassuming,” says Love, “but in the skilled hands of a stone cutter, they become the most beautiful objects.” As a jewelry designer, Love feels honoured to work with natural materials and holds the people who mine these materials in the highest respect. “Diamonds are a reminder for me that there is brilliance in everyone, but we need the right love and support to shine,” she says. “We must make sure that all who are helping us uncover these gifts are treated just as well as the materials themselves.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

“The Crown” features a 12-prong crown setting and is inspired by Victorian era jewelry. The ring’s low profile also gives it a streamlined modern look.

Natasha P. Tsimmerman

of Platt Boutique Jewelry

Track

THE INSPIRATION

For Natasha Tsimmerman, jewelry design is about balancing old and new. The designer gained an appreciation for antiques at a young age and co-founded Platt Boutique Jewelry with the goal of creating vintage-inspired pieces with a modern twist. Tsimmerman’s design for Ten/Ten is inspired by Victorian era jewelry that is at once strong, feminine, and timeless.

The Process

Our designs are always modern takes on vintage and antique pieces because we are obsessed with the level of detail and craftsmanship that characterizes jewelry of earlier eras.”

The Materials

“To me, diamonds represent beauty, strength, and longevity,” says Tsimmerman, who was excited to work with consciously sourced diamonds from Botswana. “Having the ability to trace the origin of a diamond gives you the chance to make an educated decision when choosing a piece that will stay with you for life.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com

The
Final
Cut

The “Duo Ring” is a two-part design that honors the individuality and unity within a committed relationship. When worn together, the rings complete one another to form a striking bond.

Wing Yau

of WWAKE

Track

THE INSPIRATION

Wing Yau’s jewelry designs stem from her interest in manipulating materials into signifiers of indescribable emotions. “Jewelry is intimate and transports us through time, telling our personal histories,” she says. “My Ten/Ten design is a two-part set of rings—one delicate and ethereal, and the other wide and strong. I like that it’s both airy and grounded, the way love should make you feel.” The rings can be worn apart depending on how the wearer feels, but they are designed to complete each other. “It’s a nice metaphor for the life of a relationship,” says Yau. “You may take different paths over time, but the goal is that you grow together.”

The Materials

Working with traceable materials is a central part of Yau’s practice, as is making a positive impact at their source. “Jewelry is emotional and meaningful, as is the global connection that it creates,” she says. “The fact that our Ten/Ten diamonds are fully traceable to Botswana with Tracr blockchain technology is so significant in the industry. I’m looking forward to changing the standard, and for traceable, single-origin, diamonds to become the new normal.”

To learn more about the Ten/Ten Collection and ethically sourced diamonds, visit BlueNile.com