Cool and Crease-free Sponsored by Tide

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Cool and Crease-free Sponsored by Tide

01 of 07

Stop Wrinkles in the Wash

Stop Wrinkles in the Wash

The easy, breezy fabrics of summer are what the season's all about, but wrinkles can turn a snappy look into a fashion faux-pas in a matter of minutes. You can stop most wrinkles in their tracks, however, in the wash cycle. Check the label first, but in general, washing synthetics like nylon and polyester in hot or warm water using a permanent-press cycle will help cut bank wrinkling. Wash bright colors and lightly soiled fabrics in cold water. Shake out items before placing them in the dryer, and don't overload - leave room for the clothing to tumble.

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02 of 07

Flip the Fabric

Flip the Fabric

At some point, though, you'll have to pick up that iron. When you do, turning the fabric the right way can make your job a whole lot easier. Always read the label on your clothes for proper heat and care, but here are some rough basics by fabric type: For light-colored cottons and linens, face the right-side out; for dark-colored, facing the reverse side; silks and rayons, iron facing the reverse side.

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03 of 07

To Starch or Not to Starch

To Starch or Not to Starch

Swingy cotton skirts, white dress shirts - even with today's fabulous low maintenance materials and laundry helpers. Yes, spray starch is still around, and yes, it will give you that poofy or pressed look you desire. Just don't go crazy with it; spray a quick, light, even layer on the surface you're ironing. Too much and the starch will flake off. Avoid using it on very delicate items like washable linen and silk, as it may stain.

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04 of 07

Set the Right Temp

Set the Right Temp

Check the clothing item's label to find out the fabric content before you set the temperature. Most irons have a chart on the temperature setting so you can set it correctly. A general rule of thumb: synthetics should be ironed at a low temperature, wool and silk at medium, and cotton and linen on high. We don't need to tell you what go wrong here; working with a too-hot setting can irreparably scorch or even melt a garment. Irons heat faster than they cool, so progress from low-temperature to high-temperature garments, to be on the safe side.

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05 of 07

Have Tools on Hand

Have Tools on Hand

Keep a damp sponge or spray bottle full of distilled water handy when ironing. Swipe especially creased areas with the sponge, or give it a mist with your bottle. Most importantly, keep your main tool - your iron - clean. Mineral deposits from steam can build up over time, soiling your garments. Make a paste of baking soda and water, layer in on your iron's face, then wait a few minutes. Scour off, using a cotton swab to clean the indentations.

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06 of 07

Top Ironing Tips

Top Ironing Tips

Stay flat secrets from clothing care pros: Hang up or fold clothing as soon as it leaves the dryer. Leaving them in a heap is just begging for trouble. And don't wear them again for a few hours; newly washed clothing tends to wrinkle more easily. Start your ironing in the center of the garment, and iron away from your body to prevent new wrinkles. Here's a winner: Iron both sides at once by putting a sheet of aluminum foil under your ironing board cover; the foil will reflect the iron's heat.

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07 of 07

Skip It!

Skip It!

No time - or will - to iron? If the timing is right, hang the garment in the bathroom while you're taking a shower - the steam from the water will release the wrinkles. Alternatively, mist the clothing with water from a spray bottle, or run your damp hands lightly over wrinkles in materials like linen or cotton (don't try this with silk!).

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