Inspired by Wimbledon: Our Favorite All-White Outfits in History

Gwyneth Paltrow
Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage

Thanks to Wimbledon, we’ve rekindled our love for all-white looks, a requirement for the tennis pros on the grassy courts. To celebrate the (non)color of the moment, we’ve pinpointed the most iconic looks from the past 60 years. From Marilyn Monroe in the '50s to modern-day Gwyneth Paltrow, click through to take a look back at some of the best white-centric outfits to date. Plus, get more details on how to wear white on page 87 of our July issue, or download it on your tablet.

MORE:Wimbledon Shopping: White DressesWhite by Vera Wang for David's BridalFound It! Jessica Alba's White-Hot Sandals

01 of 07

1965: Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe
WENN

This iconic dress from The Seven Year Itch sold for an astonishing $4.6 million in 2011.

02 of 07

1962: C.Z. Guest

C.Z. Guest
Sharland/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

A perennial on best-dressed lists throughout the latter half of the 20th century, the socialite was known for her effortless American style.

03 of 07

1960s: The Supremes

The Supremes
Everett

Florence Ballard, Diana Ross, and Mary Wilson made up one of the first girl groups to embrace grown-up glamour. These embellished, floor-sweeping gowns are the perfect example of their superlative style.

04 of 07

1974: Bianca Jagger

Bianca Jagger
Conde Nast Archive/Corbis

The former Mrs. Mick Jagger had an affinity for white suiting-she even wore a jacket to her wedding, over a simple (and low-cut) white dress.

05 of 07

1987: Lauren Hutton

Lauren Hutton
Alamy

Light material, a breezy cut, and of course, a touch of top-model insouciance render the menswear-inspired button-front utterly feminine.

06 of 07

1992: Sharon Stone

Sharon Stone
Everett

In Basic Instinct, the actress smashed any lingering associations between white and innocence.

07 of 07

2012: Gwyneth Paltrow

Gwyneth Paltrow
Steve Granitz/WireImage

This sharp-shouldered Tom Ford ensemble, which the actress wore to the Oscars, demonstrates that formal white needn’t be remotely bridal.

Related Articles