"I honestly think you guys saved my life, in a way."

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Britney Spears is speaking to fans for the first time since her conservatorship came to an end.

In a video shared on her social media pages, the pop star said that the #FreeBritney movement saved her life, telling fans, "The #FreeBritney movement — you guys rock. Honestly, my voice was muted and threatened for so long, and I wasn't able to speak up or say anything... I honestly think you guys saved my life, in a way. 100 percent."

"I've been in the conservatorship for 13 years. That's a really long time to be in a situation you don't want to be in," Spears said, adding that she was sharing a "hint" of her thoughts before a tell-all Oprah interview.

"I do know how embarrassing is to share the fact I've never seen cash or wasn't able to drive my car …. but honestly it still blows my mind every day I wake up how my family and the conservatorship were able to do what they did to me … it was demoralizing and degrading !!!!" she wrote in her caption. "I'm not even mentioning all the bad things they did to me which they should all be in jail for … yes including my church going mother !!!! I'm used to keeping peace for the family and keeping my mouth shut … but not this time … I have NOT FORGOTTEN and I hope they can look up tonight and know EXACTLY WHAT I MEAN !!!!"

Last Friday, Spears's court-ordered arrangement came to an end after months of legal battles. Since 2008, the singer had been under a conservatorship that she said made her work tirelessly against her will, and kept her from marrying boyfriend Sam Asghari and having another child.

"This so-called team won't let me go to the doctor to take [my IUD] out because they don't want me to have children — any more children," she testified in June. "I deserve to have a life." 

In her video, Spears said she hoped her story would "make an impact and make some changes in the corrupt system."

"I'm not here to be a victim," she said. "I lived with victims my whole life as a child, that's why I got out of my house and I worked for 20 years ... I'm here to be an advocate for people with real disabilities and real illnesses."