His middle name, on the other hand, is pretty obvious.

By Caroline Shannon-Karasik
Updated: May 08, 2019 @ 3:44 pm
DOMINIC LIPINSKI/Getty Images

In case you missed it, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle appeared together for the first time as new parents on Wednesday. The proud mom and dad beamed at their baby boy and also revealed his name: Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor.

The name might come as a surprise for people who placed their bets on other monikers. Earlier this week, People reported that the top pick among bookies was Arthur — with James, Philip and Albert trailing closely behind. 

So why did Harry and Meghan choose Archie? That we might not ever know, but perhaps a closer look at the meaning behind the name will give us a clue or two. 

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According to Nameberry, Archie is typically short for Archibald, a Spanish name that means "truly brave." Considering his very public entrance into the world, we can only imagine that Meghan and Harry want their son to face the world with a brave face. 

The name first appeared in England in the 12th century and proved to be especially popular in Scotland, however it's still unclear as to why the duke and duchess chose the shortened version of the name. (Other than the fact that it's just darn cute, of course.)

Harrison, on the other hand, is an English name that means "son of Harry," so it's easy to surmise why Harry and Meghan chose that as a middle name.

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Mountbatten-Windsor, the baby's surname, is derived from both Prince Philip's and the Queen's surnames, respectively, and is carried by all of their children and descendants.

The new parents have chosen not to give Archie a royal title (e.g. Lord or Earl), according to the New York Times, and instead opted to call him Master Archie, a title that falls in line with their wish that Baby Sussex grows up as a private citizen.

Of course, the name might not be totally out of left field. In January, The Sun reported that Prince George told a passerby who asked him what his name was: "I'm called Archie." It could be that the mischiveious 5-year-old heard the name being discussed, or maybe it can just be chalked up to kids being kids. Who knows. 

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