The 10 Best Clogs for All-Day Comfort

From Simon Miller to Sloggers, clogs have come a long way — in both style and comfort — since the wooden ‘70s staple.

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Best Clogs for All-Day Comfort

Salter House

Few types of footwear can compare to the comfort of a sturdy pair of clogs. Their backless design are easy to slip on and off, and a properly fitting pair won’t cause blisters like flats or strappy heels. Professionals like chefs, nurses, teachers, and even gardeners (those who stand all the livelong day) rely on their supportive soles and soft uppers, while their walkable height and timeless shape make them a favorite among celebrities and stylists. (Euphoria’s Barbie Ferreira, for example, has hardly taken off those viral Simon Miller clogs since she debuted them back in February.) Add a low wooden heel for a more polished look, or a chunky foam sole for extra comfort; The platonic clog is a mix of both function and form. 

There is no shortage of options online, however, so we turned to a handful of stylish experts — and tested a few pairs ourselves — to find the very best clogs at a wide range of styles, colors, and price points. We think Birkenstock’s Boston Clog — with a flat heel, supportive footbed, and soft suede upper — is the very best, but below you’ll find a pair of well-vetted clogs for everyone.

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Best Overall: Birkenstock Boston Clog

Birkenstock Boston Clog

Birkenstock

What We Love: Birkenstock’s Boston Clogs are comfortable enough for all-day wear – with or without socks — and provide excellent arch support. 

What We Don’t Love: They run wide and are tough to clean.

I don’t own Birkenstock’s Boston Clogs, but I did take a trip down to the Birkenstock store to try them on. With a supportive, contoured footbed and exceptionally soft suede upper, they really are as comfortable as they look (and as everyone claims them to be). The buckle can be loosened or tightened as needed, and the clogs come in two widths: Regular/Wide and Medium/Narrow. I have a regular-width foot, and found that the narrow width fits best (meaning that, in general, they run wide). The neutral color palette goes with just about everything, and I appreciate how unassuming and unisex they are. They also don’t have a heel, which is crucial for those who plan to wear them all day. Note that because they’re made from genuine suede, they aren’t easy to clean, and shouldn’t be worn in the rain. 

Sizes: EU 36-42 (Unisex) | Materials: Leather & EVA | Colors:

Best value: Sloggers Premium Garden Clog

Sloggers Premium Garden Clog

Amazon

What We Love: The classic shape is timeless, and they come in over 10 colors and prints.

What We Don’t Love: The size range is narrow, and man-made uppers hinder breathability. 

Under $25 on Amazon, you can’t beat a pair of durable, waterproof Sloggers. I’ve had my eye on these for a while — mostly because they’re identical to the pair of gardening clogs my mom owned in the ‘90s. They’re ugly-cool and actually comfortable, and they come in dozens of colors and patterns. They’re not as breathable as leather or hemp-plastic clogs (more on those below), but they get the job done for quick errands and short gardening sessions. The brand sent me a pair to test out, and while they do require socks to stave off foot sweat, they were surprisingly supportive — even comfortable enough for all-day wear. As for the fit: Sloggers run large, so half-sizes should size down. 

Sizes: US 6-10 | Materials: Recycled Man-Made Materials | Colors: 10+

Best Splurge: RE/DONE 70s Shearling Clog

RE/DONE 70s Shearling Clog

Saks

What We Love: Even with a wooden sole, the shearling lining and soft suede uppers make them genuinely comfortable. 

What We Don’t Love: There are few colorways and no vegan options.

RE/DONE’s suede and shearling clogs may be the most expensive pair on this list, but according to Sheila Bouttier, the head of L.A.-based antiques sourcer Galerie Provenance, they’re a warm, comfortable, and wearable take on a ‘70s classic — a rare combination for those opting for a wooden sole. “As I transitioned into [the antiques industry], I started to wear clogs, as I’m frequently on the move,” says Bouttier. “I have them in both Cognac and Black and get tons of compliments. I tell people they’re like wearing a hug.” While some may worry that the shearling lining may cause feet to overheat, Bouttier wears hers in Los Angeles year-round: “They were comfortable from day one and my feet don’t get sweaty.” If you’re looking for a vegan option (or other colorways), however, you’re out of luck: They’re only available in Black and Cognac suede.  

Sizes: EU 35-41 | Materials: Suede & Shearling | Colors: 2

Best Leather: Rachel Comey Bose Clog

Rachel Comey Bose Clog

Rachel Comey

What We Love: The soft leather uppers don’t require any breaking in.

What We Don’t Love: They’re pricey. 

Comparable in quality (and unfortunately price) to the RE/DONE clog above, Rachel Comey’s clogs are another surprisingly supportive pick for those who prefer a wooden sole. A daily favorite of Hayley Cavagnolo, an interior designer and founder of petites clothing brand Hayley Bridget, she says the Bose Clogs are a “great height” for petites, especially for those who don’t want to sacrifice comfort. “The [leather] is so soft right away — You don’t even need to break them in,” she says. Plus, both the suede and leather options are nice-looking enough to be dressed up or down. 

Sizes: US 5-11.5 | Materials: Leather, Wood, Rubber | Colors: 4

Best Wooden: Charlotte Stone Martino Clog

 Charlotte Stone Martino Clog

Charlotte Stone

What We Love: The wide size range, memory-foam footbeds, and walkable heel height. 

What We Don’t Love: Smooth soles mean minimal traction — Don’t wear them on wet grass!

Wooden soles aren’t flexible like those made from rubber, so you’re going to want some extra cushioning if you plan to wear them all day. Charlotte Stone’s Martino Clogs feature leather-wrapped memory-foam insoles, which will provide a much-needed (and in my opinion, necessary) cushion between your foot and the hardwood. I wasn’t able to test them myself, but they tick all of the rest of the boxes when looking for a comfortable clog: They’re a walkable two inches tall, available in sizes 4 to 13, and the leather uppers will only soften with wear. Their only drawback appears to be their smooth rubber soles, which may lose traction on wet surfaces. 

Sizes: US 4-13 | Materials: Leather, Wood, Rubber | Colors: 4 

Best Cork: Story MFG Clog V1

Story MFG Clog V1

Story MFG

What We Love: The contoured cork footbeds and hand-dyed uppers are entirely vegan.

What We Don’t Love: They ship from the UK.

I’ve long coveted these vegan clogs from U.K.-based slow fashion brand Story MFG. The soles are made from a cork-latex blend, which is lighter — and easier to walk in — than those made from wood. Technically orthopedic, they feature a contoured footbed and regular-to-wide width. The uppers are made from a soft, handwoven fabric, which looks more interesting than the ubiquitous Birkenstock Boston Clog. Plus, the almost-neutral swirl patterns pair well with just about anything. Because they run wide, you’ll want to size down, advises Story MFG co-founder Katy Al-Rubeyi, unless you plan to wear them with thick socks. (And remember that listed sizes are U.K. unisex sizes.)

Sizes: UK 4-11 (Unisex) | Materials: Cork, Latex, Hemp, Rubber | Colors: 3

Best for Work: Dansko Professional Black Cabrio

Dansko Professional Black Cabrio

Dansko

What We Love: Their ergonomic soles and substantial support make them excellent for those on their feet all day. 

What We Don’t Love: Some might describe them as “sensible.”

When it comes to all-day comfort, Dansko’s Professional clogs are some of the very best. A contoured midsole keeps arches supported and stable, while the curved “rocker” bottoms propel feet forward while walking. They’re a necessity for Rosie Sacco, a home baker and former pie prepper at Brooklyn-based pie shop Four and Twenty Blackbirds, who would spend upwards of six hours per day prepping pies on her feet. “I love my Danskos,” Sacco says. “I used to leave work with terrible foot pain, but now I’m comfortable all day long.” (She adds that despite their orthopedic reputation, they’re cute enough to wear outside of the kitchen, too.) 

Fellow baker Lexie Park of L.A. bake shop, Eat Nünchi, is also a fan. “I find them more comfortable than sneakers, and since I work in my home kitchen, they feel like a good hybrid between wearing shoes and house shoes,” she says. Both bakers note that they don’t require any break-in time, and are comfortable with and without socks. 

Sizes: EU 35-47| Materials: Leather & PU Leather | Colors: 2

Best Platform Clog: Simon Miller Bubble Clog

Simon Miller Bubble Clog

Simon Miller

What We Love: The playful shape and variety of colorways.

What We Don’t Love: They may be prone to scuffing.

If you’d prefer some extra height (without fearing that you’ll topple over), Simon Miller’s platform Bubble Clogs are “the perfect shoe,” according to Dani Roche, the founder and director of design studio Kastor & Pollux. “I love how playful they look, but how effortless they are to style,” she says. The clogs have puffed PU leather uppers and a soft vegan lining, giving them a bouncy, cloud-like shape and feel coupled with a walkable platform. Simon Miller currently stocks over 10 colorways, so “if you weren't convinced that clogs were the shoe for you, this is probably a sign,” Roche says. Should you opt for a lighter colorway, keep in mind that the buttery-soft vegan leather uppers may show marks and scuffs.

Sizes: US 5-11 | Materials: Polyester & PU Leather | Colors: 10+ 

Best Gardening: Plasticana Gardana Clog

Plasticana Gardana Clog

Salter House

What We Love: They’re more breathable than rubber.

What We Don’t Love: They don’t come in other colors.

These gardening clogs — sold at sustainable homegoods store, Salter House, in Brooklyn — are made from hemp plastic, which is 100 percent recyclable. When I tried them in-store, I immediately found them much more breathable — and more comfortable — than traditional rubber gardening clogs. The cushioned, woven footbed provides extra support, while the lightweight uppers hug and mold to your feet. The clogs are also a favorite of Brooklyn-based illustrator and ceramicist Laura Chautin, who told me she “wears [them] non-stop” with loose dresses for a cottagecore-esque, homesteader look. Because they run a touch big, Chautin suggests wearing them with socks.

Sizes: EU 35-46 (Unisex) | Material: Recycled Plastic & Hemp | Colors:

Best Rubber: Hunter Play Clog

Hunter Play Clog

Hunter

What We Love: The soft lining prevents sticky, sweaty feet.

What We Don’t Love: They run wide, even when worn with socks.

For drizzly days and dirty gardening sessions, rubber clogs are an excellent choice to keep your feet clean and dry. But when it comes to sweltering summer weather, they tend to heat up, giving you uncomfortable sweaty feet and lots of blisters. When I reached out to Hunter to try their Play Clogs, I figured I’d run into the aforementioned issues, erroneously believing a rubber clog couldn’t be worn all year long. Almost as soon as I put them on — on a humid, 85-degree day in New York, mind you — I realized I was mistaken. 

They’re lined with soft polyester to prevent blisters and wick sweat, which allows for all-season comfort with or without socks. They’re fairly supportive, and they stay on my feet, even with their mule-like design. I also appreciate their slight platform — something I didn’t notice online — which gives them a chunky, ‘90s feel without added bulk or weight. I wore mine to run errands, and they kept my feet much more cool and dry than a pair of well-ventilated Crocs. I do find that they run wide, so I wear mine with socks for a snugger fit. If you’re in-between sizes, I recommend sizing down. And if you have a particularly narrow foot, these may not be for you. 

Sizes: US 5-11 | Materials: Rubber & Polyester | Colors:

What To Keep In Mind:

Sole Material

Clogs have evolved from being only wooden sole shoes. Nowadays, you can find clogs with rubber, cortex-blend, gel, and even leather footbeds. If you’re into the classics, clogs with wood soles often have a leather upper for support, but tend to lean on the heavier side for a shoe. Those interested in extra support might want to consider a clog with a gel footbed, whereas the opposite will enjoy a leather or cortex-blend footbed. Even with their utilitarian feel, clogs balance style and comfort easily, depending on the sole material you’re looking for. 

Lining

A clog’s upper is typically lined with leather or rubber, which are supportive enough to wear year round. But for those cooler days, faux fur, fleece, and shearling lined clogs are a must to keep your feet warm. Not only do they add a bit of insulation, they’re also more durable and comfortable to wear even without socks. 

Sizing

Unlike most shoes, clogs tend to run in whole sizes, meaning those who wear half sizes will have to consider sizing up (or down) to the next size. Your heel should have enough room to move about freely, but the rest of your foot should fit snugly inside the clog’s upper. (Avoid toes touching the tip of the shoe!) The upper should never fit too tight as clog’s tend to stretch overtime to adapt to your feet. Those who have narrow or wide feet will need to look into width options from a brand, or if the clog has any adjustable features to receive a better fit. If you’re still struggling to break your clogs in, thick socks are always a comfy option. 

Your Questions, Answered

Are clogs with wooden soles comfortable?

After owning several pairs of wooden clogs over the years, I’ve found the most comfortable of the bunch are those with lined footbeds. Opt for pairs topped with cushioned insoles (like the Charlotte Stone Martino Clog) or lined with leather or shearling (like the Rachel Comey Bose Clog), if you plan to wear them for more than a few hours. (That’s actually why the cult-favorite Swedish Hasbeen clogs didn’t make this list — the footbeds aren’t lined, and therefore aren’t all that comfortable.) If comfort is your top priority, however, I’d skip wooden clogs altogether. 

Should clogs be comfortable immediately or should a break-in period be expected?

A break-in period is to be expected with leather clogs, though the shoes shouldn’t feel painful right out of the box. Chafing and blisters will diminish with time as the leather loosens and softens with wear. (Plus, you can always wear socks!) If the clogs are made from vegan leather or rubber, these materials are less likely to loosen over time. These should feel comfortable right out of the box, and if not, prepare to wear them with socks.

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