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Blake Lively met Gala
Credit: Getty Images

Blake Lively treats the Met Gala like her own personal runway, even going as far as matching the carpet for three of her appearances. So it's only fitting that for 2022, she brought the drama and glamour (something Vogue's Anna Wintour insisted the guests do after last year's somewhat-underwhelming attire). Arriving alongside her husband Ryan Reynolds, Lively wore a stunning gown that featured two looks in one.

Lively first stepped onto the carpet wearing an iridescent, floor-skimming, beaded Versace gown complete with a voluminous, copper-toned bustle detail and matching opera gloves. The co-host accessorized with Lorraine Schwartz diamond-shaped drop earrings and a colorful crown, and styled her blonde hair straight with subtle braids. Yet after making her initial appearance, the actress ascended the Met steps and unfurled the dress' bustle to dramatically reveal her surprise costume change: A stunning copper-and-turquoise train.

Met Gala Red Carpet 2022
Credit: Getty Images

The actress also changed opera gloves for her second look, swapping the copper pair for gold and silver gloves that matched her new skirt. On her way into the event, Lively shared that the dress contained references to famous New York City landmarks like the Statue of liberty, Grand Central, and the Empire State Building.

In the past, Lively has stuck with a few favorite designers, including Versace. Back in 2018, for what might be her most memorable Met Gala appearance, the actress' Atelier Versace gown took more than 600 hours to complete. While there's no word yet on what it took to get Blake's look finished this year, we're bound to hear about all the details once Lively talks in-depth about the dress — which she loves doing, especially when she's personally involved in each and every step.

"They're making something custom for it," she said of the ornate burgundy-and-gold dress she wore to the 2018's event, where the theme was 'Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination'. "So, it's kind of nice, because I have a bunch of artists around me who I have direct relationships with. It's sort of a group effort with that. I rely on people who do that for a living rather than outsourcing it to someone else."