By Amanda Richards
Updated: Feb 07, 2019 @ 1:40 pm
Mike Coppola/Getty Images

I’ve been to plenty of fashion shows, but something about 11 Honoré’s first-ever runway show on Feb. 6 felt like a rarefied occasion. Maybe it was the concentration of unbelievably styled out plus-size women sitting in one room. Maybe it was the fact that the soundtrack to the show included both Fleetwood Mac and Robyn. Probably, though, it was the surprise show closer: Laverne Cox, dressed in an unbelievable Zac Posen tulle gown and IPPOLITA jewelry, her entire celestial being hair-flipping her way down the runway.

RELATED: A NYFW Plus Size Street Style Gallery

11 Honoré is a size-inclusive e-commerce site that curates luxury designers in size 10-20+, including Brandon Maxwell, Christian Siriano, Chromat, Cushnie, Lela Rose, Marchesa, and more. The brand partnered with Shopify for the NYFW show, and every single look that came down the runway — silk jumpsuits, floral tea dresses, and more — are shoppable on the website now. Cox walked with high-profile plus size models like Candace Huffine, Precious Lee, and Marquita Pring.

For Cox, participating in the show was about being a part of something she truly believes in — that is, making luxury, high-end fashion an option for everyone who wants it.

“I’ve been in photo shoots over the years for various magazine, and I’ll be in the fitting — after I’ve told them my sizes — and when I get there, nothing actually fits,” Cox tells InStyle. “I’m a size 10-12, bigger than 12 sometimes. It’s depressing. I cried the last time it happened. It’s really, really awful. I want to feel good about myself, but then nothing fits, and I feel unattractive. I feel like, do I even deserve to be there?”

Cox also understand that if it’s difficult for her to find clothes at a 10-12, it’s nearly impossible for anyone in larger sizes to find the luxury fashion they’re searching for. She also says that true inclusivity in fashion extends beyond size.

“It’s about everyone being at the table at every price point,” Cox says. “All sizes, all races, and gender expressions. There’s lots of people who identify as non-binary, or who identify as males who would want to wear a dress like this. They should be able to wear it, and have a place to go where they can find something like this that fits.”

 

 

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