Food & Drink

A Non-Foamy Latte Recipe in Honor of Mugatu and Zoolander 2

A Non-Foamy Latte Recipe in Honor of Mugatu and <em>Zoolander 2</em>
Photos 12 / Alamy Stock Photo

With Zoolander 2 out in theaters today, our nostalgia for the first film is at an all-time high. Who could forget the famous scene in which Mugatu (hilariously played by Will Ferrell) chucks his steaming hot latte in the face of his poor assistant? “Todd, are you not aware that I get farty and bloated with a foamy latte?!” he screams. (In fact, we can expect another painful caffeine facial in the sequel, according to the trailer.)

In anticipation of the much-hyped movie, we’re whipping up an extra hot, non-foamy latte from Supercrown Coffee Roasters, a new java joint in Brooklyn, N.Y.C. “The textured milk finish highlights the flavor profiles of the coffee and brings out the sugars for a smooth mouthfeel, which balances well with the espresso that’s blended throughout,” says Darleen Scherer, Supercrown's CEO and founder. “The latte art is a beautiful bonus, that's both visually appealing and delicious."

Pour yourself a cup and start practicing your Blue Steel. 

RELATED: 8 Style Lessons We Learned From Zoolander

Supercrown Latte

Ingredients
Organic whole milk
Espresso (Supercrown currently uses a 50/50 blend of these coffees: a Sulawesi PT Toarco, for its syrupy body and sweetness, and a Peru Inambari, for its chocolate and caramel notes)

Tools
Espresso machine 

RELATED: Stephanie Izard's Biscotti Coffee Recipe Will Revolutionize Your Afternoon Pick-Me-Up

Directions 
1. Steam organic whole milk between 140º and 145º in a 10 oz milk pitcher, which brings out the sugar (lactose) while also texturing it to create “microfoam.” This milk should have the appearance of wet paint when done, with no visible bubbles. 
2. Free pour the textured milk into the espresso that was pulling while preparing the milk. This technique blends the two components of espresso and milk together throughout the drink. 
3. For latte art, you can pour what is known as a “tulip.” Learn how here

 
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