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Samantha Faragalli
Sep 05, 2015 @ 3:45 pm

Sometimes getting a salon appointment can be a difficult feat—the busy schedules of both you and your hair stylist can result in waiting weeks (or even months!) to get a clean trim or fresh color. That said, we asked Vaughn Acord, Celebrity Stylist and Founder of V76 by Vaughn, to give us essential salon etiquette tips to keep in mind for those times when you simply can’t be squeezed into the book. Is it rude to ask your stylist to work out of your home? Is it indecent to follow up with the salon receptionist over and over again? Read on to find out what to do and what not to do if your stylist is booked solid.

According to Acord, there are a few different measures you can take if your stylist is completely booked. “If you’re really pressed and need to do something, I suggest getting the hair cleaned up like a bang trim for women or a cleaning up of the sideburns, back of the neck or behind the ears for men,” he tells InStyle. “It’s usually complimentary when a full haircut isn’t needed.” If your stylist isn’t willing to do that, Acord recommends asking to be put on a waiting list. That way, your stylist can notice the urgency, and possibly fit you in during their lunch break. If there’s really no fitting you in after trying both of those strategies, Acord suggests asking them who else they would recommend at the salon. Even though it won’t be your usual stylist, “They usually recommend a person who has been working with them closely,” he adds.

RELATED: The Foolproof Technique to Trim Your Own Bangs Between Salon Appointments

A friendly rapport with the receptionist can never hurt. Per Acord, the proper etiquette is to ask the receptionist to please give you a call if there’s an opening. “When booking the appointment, if there’s something pressing coming up that you need to get in for, let them know,” he adds. “Sometimes people really feel like they need the confidence that the haircut gives them, and the desk should know.”

However, Acord dissuades asking your stylist to come to your house during their off hours. Aside from the pricey aspect, he suggests keeping in mind that the lighting is different, as is the height of the chair. That said, working from home isn’t as fun for the stylist as you may think. “Salons pride themselves on being teams, and there’s a community there that doesn’t happen in any other setting, in any way," he adds. “It’s a community where people talk and care about each other. It’s where we work.”

RELATED: Salon Etiquette: How Late Is Too Late, and What to Do If You Need to Cancel

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