Jonathan Borge
Feb 22, 2018 @ 1:00 pm

A former Bond girl has joined the #MeToo conversation.

In a new cover story for Playboy magazine, 67-year-old British star Jane Seymour explains why now is the time for her to share her story. The Brit—known for her roles in Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman and the 1973 James Bond film Live and Let Die—has previously posed for the controversial men’s magazine, first in July 1973 and later in January 1987.

The story touches on Seymour’s rise in Hollywood—she’s won two Golden Globes and one Emmy—and her current role on the sitcom Let’s Get Physical, and then pivots to the topic of sexual harassment in the entertainment industry. She first shared her story on Australia’s morning show, Sunrise 7 in November after multiple women accused Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct and in some cases, rape.

Aaron Feaver/Playboy

In 1972, a powerful Hollywood producer allegedly asked her to visit his home for a screen test for a new role. After arriving and realizing they were alone, she describes him as putting his hand on her leg and pressuring her to reciprocate. According to her account, she asked him to call her a cab after feeling “terrified.”

“He put me in a car and said, ‘If anyone knows you ever came here, if you ever tell anyone, ever, I’ll guarantee you never work again anywhere on the planet,” she tells Playboy. “And he had that power. I got in the cab and cried, terrified.” The following day, her agent asked whether she met the producer, to which the agent then reacting by sighing and admitting he had a “bit of a reputation.”

RELATED: Harvey Weinstein Cites Quotes from J.Law and Gwyneth Paltrow in His Legal Defense

So why did she choose to speak up now?

“The only reason I’ve ever told that story is that women should have a choice,” she says. “A lot of women took the bait and lived happily ever after. My problem was that my agent knew. I was put in a situation where I couldn’t show what I could do. And I’m a person who, when something bad happens, I get over it and move forward..”

While Seymour returned to Hollywood, she says she took some time in England away from acting after that incident. “I got fat. I baked bread and ate a whole loaf every morning and did needlepoint. I decided I wasn’t going to do this anymore. I wasn’t prepared to do what had to be done,” she shared.

Her story indeed comes in the aftermath of allegations against Weinstein, and grassroots movements like Time’s Up, which work to eradicate sexual harassment at work.

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