Laurence Monneret/Getty

This article originally appeared on Hello Giggles. For more stories like this, visit hellogiggles.com.

Alexandra Whittaker
Sep 29, 2017 @ 12:00 pm

Whether we’re on social media, reading articles, driving down the street surrounded by billboards, or simply watching television, we’re exposed to societal standards of beauty, constantly. Yes, the fashion, entertainment, and beauty industries are all making changes to become more inclusive, but we’re still being fed photoshopped images of what we’re supposed to look like—thin, perfect, flawless.

Thankfully, Getty Images is stepping up and banning digitally slimmed models in an effort to help change the way women are represented in media.

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Getty has specifically banned the altering of a model’s shape to make them look thinner or bigger. So hopefully, we will have some more realistic-looking images in our day-to-day lives.

But no one’s perfect, and no company is perfect either. While Getty is making a palpable difference with this new decree, it’s not without its flaws. According to i-D, Getty sent out an email explaining the new guidelines for submitting photos. They said, “[O]ther changes made to models like a change of hair color, nose shape, retouching of skin or blemishes, etc., are outside the scope of this new law, and are therefore still acceptable.”

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So no, photographers cannot make any major changes with the silhouette or shape of a model in an image, but they can still tweak it. But baby steps, right?

After i-D reached out to Getty, they issued the following response:

“As a leader in visual communications, Getty Images upholds the responsibility to ensure accurate and authentic visual representation. Our perceptions of what is possible are often shaped by what we see: positive imagery can have direct impact on fighting stereotypes, creating tolerance, and empowering communities to feel represented in society. That’s why over the last several years, Getty Images has made a concerted effort to change the way women and other marginalized communities are represented in media and advertising.”

While this new initiative isn’t perfect, it’s a wonderful step in the right direction, and we’re so here for that.

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