Meghan Overdeep
Jan 03, 2018 @ 9:30 am

Sexuality and feminism aren't mutually exclusive for Emily Ratajkowski. In the January cover story for Harpers Bazaar Arabia, the sultry starlet addressed her polarizing opinions on womanhood and how she was forced to accept her sexuality at a very young age.

For starters, Ratajkowski's take on feminism is surprisingly simple. She believes that a woman should have a choice, meaning that nobody should be able to dictate how a woman lives her life, and that extends from what she says and wears to what she does.

“I think a lot of people really feel that the idea of a woman being sexual or being sexualized is the opposite of feminism, when I feel like, in some ways, that conversation itself can be oppressive to women, because you’re telling them how to dress and how to act, which is actually the opposite of feminism," Ratajkowski mused.

The 26-year-old went on to describe her “interesting introduction into womanhood,” and how she matured physically far earlier than her peers—an experience that undoubtedly shaped her views of sexuality. “I was a 12 year old [with D-cup breasts] but people looked at me as a 21 year old,” the model-turned-actress recalled.

NYC NYE

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“It was really difficult for me to understand and to come to terms with... that identity, people’s perception of me," she continued. "It’s hard for a 12-year-old girl, who is basically feeling like ‘Why don’t you just leave me alone,' because I don’t see men having to justify what they wear or how they express themselves.”

RELATED: Emily Ratajkowski Claims the Fashion Industry Doesn't Like Her Boobs

Ratajkowski recounted how her mother explained that she never had to change who she was for someone else. “She told me, ‘wear whatever you want, do whatever you want, it doesn’t matter, that’s just your body and that’s who you are so it’s not your issue.’ There was an acceptance there.”

This idea of acceptance informs her views on the #MeToo movement, as well. “It’s really about women supporting women. But it’s more than just saying ‘me too’, it’s about saying ‘I believe you,' and really getting behind someone."

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