Are "Tubular" Mascaras Better than Waterproof?

Are "Tubular" Mascaras Better than Waterproof?
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If I had a dollar for every time some well-meaning person told me my mascara was smudged, I’d have zero guilt about my daily Starbucks habit. It seemed mascara of any sort—and trust me, I tried every primer and waterproof formula I could get my hands on—was incapable of withstanding the oil slicks that are my eyelids.

So it was nothing short of serendipitous that Trish McEvoy High-Volume Mascara ($31; nordstrom.com) found its way into my life a few months ago. The brand bills the formula as “better than waterproof” and, after wearing it consistently sans smudges, streaks, or smears, I’m totally drinking the Kool-Aid.

Since my job involves a definite degree of beauty detective work, I couldn’t rest until I found out why this mascara was so superior. Turns out, it’s because the formula is not only waterproof, but one of those "tubular" types that wraps around lashes to create a cylindrical structure as opposed to simply coating the surface. The tubes bind to your lashes to become budge-proof, yet gently slide off with standard makeup remover. (Yep, you’ll actually see the tiny cylinders on your cleansing cloth.)

Blinc ($26; blincinc.com) popularized this game-changing formula, but these days, even drugstore brands—L'Oréal Paris Double Extend Beauty Tubes Mascara ($8; target.com) is famously long-lasting—have hopped aboard the tube train. It's an innovation that's definitely worth checking out if, like me, your mascara requires a little extra discipline.

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