Food & Drink

The Next Beverage Trend Is... Mushrooms?

The Next Beverage Trend Is... Mushrooms?
Getty Images
Shop This Post

Earlier this year, Gwyneth Paltrow made waves on the Internet with the release of the recipe for her “Morning Smoothie.” Under most circumstances, a blended beverage wouldn’t cause much of a stir—but normal breakfast shakes don’t contain ingredients like lion’s mane mushroom-infused “Brain Dust” and Vanilla Mushroom Protein powder. 


Yes, Goop is drinking ‘shrooms and loving it. And surprisingly, she’s not the only one liquefying the savory fungi. Los Angeles-based beverage company Lifehouse Tonics + Elixirs offers customers a “Shroom Shake,” which features eight different mushroom varietals including chaga, cordyceps, maitake, and turkey tail. In December, InStyle shared with readers a cocktail recipe that requires the use of candy cap mushroom-infused vermouth. "Mushrooms are part of the sixth taste known as umami,” explains the drink’s creator Matthew Biancaniello, whose book Eat Your Drink: Culinary Cocktails is now available for purchase ($15; “They add a great savory and steak-like quality to bourbon,” he says of his Umami Manhattan cocktail (recipe below). 

But besides taste—and the fact that Goop is doing it—is there any real reason to start incorporating mushrooms into our diet? Celeb dietician Keri Glassman says yes. “It’s the only fruit or vegetable with vitamin D,” she explains. “I am huge fan of mushrooms and have them in my greens blend, which I have all of my clients take.”

RELATED: 5 Foodstagrammers You Need to Follow Now

Glassman, who prefers to use button, crimini, and portabella mushrooms, says, “Research shows that mushrooms are also an effective substitute for meats if you’re looking to reduce daily calorie and fat intake, but still want to feel full and satisfied after the meal.” The ground dwellers are also rich in antioxidants like selenium and ergothioneine, “which can help protect body cells from damage that might lead to heart disease, some cancers, and other diseases of aging,” Glassman explains.

Trend, approved. Now go make yourself a mushroom cocktail—it’s good for you, apparently.

Mia Wasilevich

Umami Manhattan 


2 oz shiitake or morel infused Elijah Craig 12 Year Bourbon ($30;
1/2 oz CapRock Bitter ($45;
1/2 oz Cynar ($27;

RELATED: You Can Now Eat Kanye West-Themed Ice Cream


1. To make the mushroom infused bourbon: Place 2 oz of fresh shiitake or morel mushrooms in an airtight container for one week with one bottle of bourbon. Once infused, strain it back into the bottle and refrigerate. It will last up to six months.

2. To assemble the cocktail: Place everything in a mixing glass and stir until cold. Strain into a coup without ice.

The Latest in Video

Master the Cocktail Party With Jessica Seinfeld's Tips
See More Videos

More Food & Drink

See All Latest News

Sponsored Stories

The Latest in Food & Drink

Back to Top