Is Sleeping on Wet Hair Really That Bad? We Have The Answer

Is Sleeping on Wet Hair <em>Really</em> That Bad? We Have The Answer
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Going to bed with wet hair is good for clocking in extra minutes of beauty sleep, but does feeling more awake in the morning mean causing damage to your hair in the process?

“Wet hair is in a compromised state and extra care should be taken,” explains Matrix SoColor Celebrity Hairstylist Nick Stenson. “Just as you’re cautioned not to pull and tug on wet hair when you brush or comb it, the same type of care should be taken during sleep. Each time you toss or turn in bed, your wet hair is being stretched and pulled.”

If you can’t keep your eyes open long enough to completely blow-dry your strands, Stenson recommends towel-drying hair before you let your head hit the pillows. “If your hair is in good condition, one night with wet hair isn’t going to permanently damage things, but for hair that’s over-processed, it’s really not a good situation at all,” he says.

RELATED: What Does Sleeping on a Silk Pillowcase Actually Do for Your Hair and Skin?

Swapping your cotton pillowcase for a silk one will also do more than just give your bedroom a luxe vibe. If you find yourself sleeping on damp hair often, Stenson suggests getting your beauty sleeon on silk or satin. “The smaller fibers will create less drag on the hair if you move throughout the night.”

Since staying completely still for an entire night’s sleep is pretty unrealistic, if your hair does do any rubbing against your pillowcases, Stenson suggests running a smoothing cream such as Matrix Style Link Prep Smooth Setter Smoothing Cream ($18; ulta.com) to prevent any frizz or kinks. And if you’re curly, use a defining cream such as Matrix Style Link Blowout Curvy Queen ($20; ulta.com) to keep curls bouncy.

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