Olay's SkinAdvisor Tool Told Me How Old My Skin Looks

Olay's SkinAdvisor Tool Told Me How Old My Skin Looks
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It's like your most honest friend just went digital.

The worlds of beauty and technology have been colliding in the most harmonious way of late, with a slew of apps that are able to do everything from match the color of your favorite sweater to its nail polish shade equivalent to booking an at-home blowout on the fly. Your phone essentially has the ability to be your own compact glam team.

Olay just launched its own revolutionary online beauty tool, SkinAdvisor, which gets so up-close and personal with users that it will reportedly tell you how old your skin really looks. It's kind of a daunting concept, leaving me to wonder, "Could I really handle the truth?"

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But ever the intrepid beauty reporter, I decided to give it a try. I mean, the whole process is super easy, and considering it is just an app, I was prepared to take it with a grain of salt.

You head over to the SkinAdvisor website and Olay walks you through each step, like snapping a selfie (preferably with hair pulled back, sans makeup), then answering a few questions about your skin concerns and divulging your age. Once you've submitted your photo, SkinAdvisor asks a few quick questions about your daily skin-care regimen, then they hit you with the results.

My skin's true age? Five years younger than I am IRL...and I'll take it. The tool zeroes in on each area of the face, deeming one the best in terms of how its aging (mine was crow's feet) and the area that needs the most improvement (undereye area for me—tell me something I didn't already know). Then, SkinAdvisor offers up a list of products it thinks is most beneficial for your skin.

So could I handle the truth? Absolutely. If SkinAdvisor had clocked my skin any younger I would have probably cried foul. It's a fun, quick little experiment in beauty that yields interesting results.

Still, everyone's skin ages differently, depending on genetics as well as what you've been exposed to. For the most accurate reading on what's normal or of concern, you might want to chat with a derm. 

 
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